Festive Touch
Mumbai

Mumabi heralds spring with two festivals that are celebrated with much pomp and splendour. Add to this, an ever-evolving restaurant scene and new street art, and there’s much to see and do in the city.

Holi is one of the most important festivals in the Indian calendar and is celebrated on a grande and new street art, and there’s much to see and do in the city.

Holi is one of the most important festivals in the Indian calendar and is celebrated on a grand scale in Mumbai. This festival of colours begins on March 20th with bonfires being lit in every neighbourhood – these bonfires represent the demoness Holika and symbolise the victory of good over evil. The next day, March 21st, will be one big street party! Young and old all indulge in playful revelry, smearing each other with coloured powders, squirting water pistols, and aiming water balloons at all and sundry.

Close on the heels of Holi, Maharashtrians celebrate the New Year according to the Hindu lunar calendar. Gudi Padwa falls on April 6th this year. Many families erect a Gudi flag with a silk cloth, garlanded with flowers and auspicious mango tree leaves, topped by an upturned pot. This flag is a symbol of prosperity and good luck in the New Year and is usually displayed in windows or balconies or on the roof or on a nearby tree. The festival is also marked by colourful (and noisy) parades around the city featuring men and women in traditional costumes dancing to the beat of drums. No Indian festival is complete without food. Gudi Padwa is often celebrated with the traditional Maharashtrian dessert of puran poli, a flatbread stuffed with sweetened lentil mixture, served with a drizzle of ghee (clarified butter) and a side of thin, spicy curry.

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